What We Do

3 months ago

Counselors Hailey Flood, grades 9 and 10 (hflood@mcps.k12.va.us), and Anne Baltrusaitis, grades 11 and 12 (abaltrusaitis@mcps.k12.va.us), are available to answer questions via email. If you are unable to communicate by email, please leave a message at 804-758-9702 with your contact information. Your call will be returned as soon as possible.

Academic Progress

Coordinate and mail progress reports and report cards
Counsel students with academic difficulties
Attend parent conferences
Complete and mail credit analysis to parents
Identify and contact parents of failing students
Determine grade retentions and summer school participants
Determine and create honor rolls

Scheduling

Update scheduling information – solicit teacher course requests, coordinate with DOE regulations, publish Program of Studies
Distribute scheduling materials to students
Meet with parents of rising ninth graders to describe scheduling process/diploma requirements
Meet with students individually to discuss schedule choices
Create schedule for the next school year
Handle drop/add courses

Testing

Register students, administer, and interpret PSAT
Compile numbers of students taking end-of-course SOLs
Identify students needing SOL retakes
Assist with SOL administration
Administer AP Exams
Help students register for the SAT and ACT

Transition

Organize freshmen orientation
Hold College Application/Scholarship meeting for parents
Hold Financial Aid Workshop
Counsel students regarding college choices
Mail mid-year and final transcripts to colleges
Organize college fairs
Write college recommendations
Organize ASVAB administration and interpretation to eleventh graders
Administer Vocational Testing to all ninth and tenth graders
Meet with students individually to discuss results and determine tentative career goals
Participate on committee which organizes the career speaker program
Assist with the ISAEP transition plans

Student Support

Foster teacher/student relations
Select students for leadership conferences
Provide crisis counseling for individual students and school emergencies
Assist with Governor’s School application process
Identify student scholarship recipients
Organize and present scholarship awards
Identify honor graduates
Order diplomas
Determine diploma seal recipients

Special Education

Attend IEP/504 meetings/triennial evaluation
Complete classroom observations
Attend child study meetings

Administrative

Register new students
Attend Counseling and Faculty meetings
Attend Advisory and Committee meetings
Maintain student records

Summer Programs & Opportunities

3 months ago

Program Opportunities


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For an immersive learning experience this summer, encourage your high school students to explore the opportunities available through the University of Vermont!

Our 4-week, academically rigorous, and fully online Summer Academy courses are designed exclusively for students who have completed 10th, 11th, or 12th grade and are tailored to provide an in-depth exploration of a specific field of study in subjects ranging from journalism and photography to health and medicine. 

What's more, all summer Pre-College programs at UVM (including our courses below) are offered to out-of-state students at 50% off academic year tuition rates.

Summer Academy Courses Include:

  • Adventures in Neuroscience
  • Biomedical Science and Human Disease
  • Drones for Environmental Mapping
  • Facing Environmental Futures
  • Health and Medicine
  • Storytelling with Photographs


Pre-College Program in American History Start Your Future by Studying the Past...About Pre-College Program in American History at William & Mary. This unique program offers high school students an opportunity to live and study at William & Mary for three weeks during the summer. Students will earn 4 hours of transferable college credit studying American history right where it happened. What sets the program apart from your typical history class is that students travel daily to the museums, battlefields, archaeological sites, homes, and places where history lives. They will talk with professional historians and curators, and learn not only the history of America but what's being done to preserve it. Students also participate in an active archaeological dig and get their hands dirty looking for 18th-century artifacts A background in American history is not required, however, an open mind, independent thinking, creativity, and a spirit of adventure are essential. Financial assistance available form NIAHD. Visit www.wm.edu for more information. 

Girls Go CyberStart
Learn ethical hacking, forensics and Linux for free. Work your way through a vast online training game to learn new skills and compete for cash prizes! Whether you’re already a white-hat hacker in training or you’ve never touched a keyboard before, you can take part in Girls Go CyberStart. You’ll test your natural creativity, problem solving ability, and curiosity by taking on the role of a security agent to crack codes and stop cyber criminals in their tracks. We have over 200 challenges for you to tackle either on your own or in a team with friends! Click here for more information and dates.

Virginia Tech The College of Science is offering several fun and educational camps this summer for rising 6th through 12th graders. Campers will carry out experiments, work with cutting-edge technology, and solve real-life problems. Our talented professors and staff will inspire and prepare campers for a great future in science! Camps include: Explore Science (an array of topics)CSI: Blacksburg Outbreak at Virginia Tech Geosciences: Using Data & Technology to Understand Earth and Mars Nanocamp For more info, click HERE.

Come to Adelphi this summer. Live on campus. Take an amazing class. Make new friends. Earn college credits. All in our summer program tailored just for you! This summer, experience Adelphi’s personalized approach to education and enroll in our Summer Pre-College programs. College Consensus recently ranked Adelphi’s Pre-College Summer programs among the top 30 in the US. Visit 
precollege.adelphi.edu for more information.

Duke Youth Programs is now offering online courses!


Duke Youth Programs’ Summer Online Program offers two sessions of classes for middle and high school students. Our richly diverse participants will spend their days crafting fiction and nonfiction, writing and performing poems, cracking and creating codes, exploring trailblazing research, debating ethical dilemmas, and enjoying virtual tours of Duke’s world class labs and other popular sites on Duke’s campus. Session I will meet during the weeks of June 15 - June 26 and Session II will meet during the weeks of July 13 - July 24. 

Classes will meet synchronous from 10:00 am-12:00 pm and asynchronous from 1:00 pm-3:00 pm. 

Our programs promote innovation, engagement, and a love for learning. The classes are designed to provide each participant with a high-quality academic experience and opportunities to connect with peers with similar interests and curiosities.

Join us this summer and be transformed! 

Please visit our website at www.learnmore.duke.edu/youth to learn more about our programs.


YOUR ADVENTURE STARTS HERE We know that summer is your time to break away from the world you know and do something extraordinary. You’ve come to the right place. Broadreach programs take place in every corner of the globe and teach you unique skills. Wherever you go, you’ll be inspired by great adventures and challenged with learning experiences unlike anything you’ve done before.

Gettysburg College is excited to offer several opportunities for high school juniors and sophomores to attend academic camps over the summer months. Subjects include psychology, history, creative writing, piano, or information technology. Please find information to share with your students about our academic camps below: 
  • Camp Psych - Campers will get hands-on experiences that introduce them to research in psychology during this fun, challenging, and engaging introduction to the field.
  • Sunderman Piano Institute - Pianists 12-17 years old who desire to improve their performance skills, collaborate with other pianists, and dive deeply into related music subjects of their choice. Pianists will have opportunities to perform in daily studio class, and the final Friday concert will showcase pianists in both solo and ensemble works.
  • Writing Camp - Students gain an in-depth introduction to all four genres of creative writing: fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and writing for stage and screen.
  • 3D Object Modeling and Printing Camp - Students will study 3D object modeling and printing starting with the basics of a 3D printer. After learning the fundamentals, they will practice designing objects.
  • Coding for Robotics & Electronics Camp - Students will gain hands-on experiences in coding, wiring, hardware, and building robots through the open source software known as Arduino. Throughout this camp, campers will learn basic electrical engineering, the physics behind electricity, and how to think like a scientist.
  • Civil War Institute Summer Conference - The High School Student Scholarship component of Gettysburg College's annual Civil War Institute summer conference provides high school students an opportunity to explore the history of the Civil War era on the site of the war's most decisive battle. 
Virginia Masonry Association This 3.5 year Apprenticeship allows apprentices to learn from seasoned masons with on-the-job training during the day, while taking courses one night per week. Courses run a total of 30 weeks and include textbook work as well as hans-on training. Upon completion of the Apprenticeship, graduates become Journeyman Bricklayers and will receive certification from the State of Virginia Department of Labor and Industry. This certification is recognized nationally. This program is designed for employees of our Masonry Contractor Members. It is completely free of charge to the Apprentice (including textbook!) who will also be paid for their on-the-job training. Visit the website at www.VirginiaMasonry.org for more information.

Rustic Pathways Not only is Rustic Pathways a pioneer in providing quality travel and service programs for students and educators, but we’re also redefining how to integrate education, travel, and philanthropy in a world where all people are connected by a shared humanity. At Rustic, our mission, vision, and values drive the way we run our programs, partner with local communities, and live our lives.
Our mission is to empower students through innovative and responsible travel experiences to positively impact lives and communities around the world.

Summer Sports Camps: We offer Summer Falcon Sports Camps for student 8 to 18 who want to participate in numerous sports and are led by our very own head coaches! Click here for additional information.

CIEE High School Summer Abroad and Global Navigator Scholarships with 30 summer programs in Language & Culture, Service & Leadership, and Content Studies, it's easy for student to follow their passions and chart a course to one of 16 amazing destinations around the world.
Global Navigator Scholarship make this opportunity possible for deserving students. Only available through CIEE, these scholarships help families cover 10 to 100 percent of the cost of our summer study abroad programs. Scholarships are awarded based on a combination of merit, financial need, and student interest in our program themes.
There's more online! Visit our website at ciee.org/high-school-summer abroad for more information.

ASSE International Student Exchange Program is pleased to provide your students an opportunity to study abroad in the 2018-19 school year. Exchange students develop leadership skills, self-confidence and a greater understanding of the complexities of the world around them. This is why the best universities, as well as corporations and other professionals, look favorably on student who have spent a school year abroad. For more information, visit ASSE.com.

Middle and High School Summer Experiences continue on your path of academic success with high school and middle school summer programs at Washington University in St. Louis. To learn more or to apply, visit summerexperiences.

Graduation Requirements

3 months ago

Graduation Requirements
Diploma Types  

The Standard Diploma reflects the basic achievement the Commonwealth sees as necessary for citizens; four English, three math (at or above the level of algebra), three science (from two science disciplines), and three social studies credits (including both VA/US History and VA/US Government), two Physical Education courses, one fine or practical art elective, two electives in sequence, and three other elective credits for a total of 22 credits.  

The Advanced Diploma is encouraged to better prepare students for their post-secondary education choices.In addition to the academic core requirements of the Standard Diploma, Advanced Diploma recipients must complete three credits of a foreign language (or two credits in two languages), one additional credit each in Math, Science (from three science disciplines), and Social Studies, one fine or practical art and two other electives for 24 total credits.  

The Special Diploma is granted to disabled students who complete their Individualized Education Plan objectives.

Standard vs. Verified Credits.  Standards of Learning Tests (SOLs) are used to assess whether students have adequately mastered the course material of a given subject.  The Commonwealth has added passage of a number of End of Course SOLs to its list of requirements for Standard and Advanced Diplomas.  Passing the course yields a standard credit; passing the course and the corresponding SOL test together yields a verified credit.

Verified Credits per Diploma Type.  Advanced Diploma requirements include 9 verified credits: two from English 11 (Writing and Reading), 2 each in math, science, and social studies, and another of the student's choosing.  Standard Diploma requirements and beyond must earn two from English (Writing and Reading), one each in math, science, and social studies, and one of the student's choosing. The Modified Standard  Diploma uses scores from 8th grade Math and Reading SOLs to verify credit. The Special Diploma students testing standard is the VAAP in 11th grade.  Completion of some industry certifications and other national tests may be used for verified credit.

SOL Information
End of Course Tests.  The following courses have SOL tests: English 10 (Writing), English 11 (Reading), Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II/Trigonometry, Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, World History I, World History II, VA/US History.  All students enrolled in these courses must take the End of Course Test, regardless of diploma type or number of SOLs already passed.

Administration.  SOL tests are given at the end of the course (January and June).  If a student scores between 375 and 399 (just short of the passing grade of 400), he/she is allowed to take an expedited retake, a special administration a few weeks after the original test. Students who have a standard credit but who have not passed the SOL for the verified credit may retake the SOL during one of the school year testing sessions or in the summer(remediation is encouraged).

Career Information

3 months ago

Choosing a Career
Identifying your post-secondary career goals early in your high school career can help you select courses that will promote these goals.  The most important piece of the career puzzle is finding information about yourself - your interests, your abilities, and your work values.  MHS students will begin the exploration process in ninth grade, and will keep portfolios to take with them when they graduate.

Step One - Interests.  All freshmen participate in career testing sometime during the year. Students will take the assessments available on www.VaWizard.org. Originally created by the Community College system, this site has recently been expanded to include 4-year college and local employment information. Students are welcome and encouraged to view the resources on this site. Another excellent site for free career exploration and exploration is www.vaview.vt.edu . This is another state-sponsored side with activities and local information.

Alternatively, one can complete an on-line interest inventory at www.careerkey.org for a small fee.  Both yield accurate results and suggest job titles to investigate.

Step Two - Abilities.  All juniors are encouraged to take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB), usually offered in the winter. While it is used by military recruiters to identify students with skills utilized in the military, students have ABSOLUTELY NO OBLIGATION to respond positively to any inquiries from recruiters.  The ASVAB remains a valuable tool in identifying your own areas of strength; it compares your skills to those of similarly aged students.  Students who do not wish to  take the ASVAB but would like to identify their skills may contact the Guidance Office for an alternate assessment.  See www.asvabprogram.com for more information about the ASVAB and also for other excellent career information.

Step Three - Work Values.  While the size of a paycheck is often enough to make a job worthwhile, other features such as environment, traveling, and benefits also have an impact.  Identifying the features you MUST have and those you'd like to have will greatly affect your satisfaction.  Interested students can complete the Work Values Inventory on the Wizard site, or a self-assessment at home.

Step Four - Research.  The best first source of career field information is the Occupational Outlook Handbook.  The Media Center has printed copies.  It can also be accessed on-line at www.bls.gov/oco/home.htm .  Each entry includes job descriptions, work environment, training requirements, earnings, employment outlook, related occupations, and other sources of information. 

Step Five - Putting Yourself Out There.  You've done an amazing amount of work and now have a direction.  Try it out by: Volunteering or Working - the best way to find out what you like and don't like about a job is trying it;  Taking courses in high school and college - try new things; Talking to people in the field - if you can't immediately try it for yourself, talk to people who have. See your counselor to discuss options.

Getting a Job
If possible, try to find a job in or near the field you're interested in.  You'll have a resume enhancing experience and the chance to put your research to the test!

Step One - Where the Jobs Are
     
* Newspapers - the Southside Sentinel comes out on Thursdays - and the help wanted ads are online
     * Networking - this is a fancy word for telling friends and family you're looking for work, and ask if they know of any openings.   They'll tell their friends who will tell their friends, and... (you get the idea). Having someone recommend you also increases your chances of being selected.
     * Stopping at a business, completing an application, and waiting for an opening.

Step Two - Completing Applications
     * ALWAYS dress appropriately, even if you're just dropping by for a minute.  First impressions last.  Consider this your first interview.
     * Be polite and respectful to EVERYONE you meet - again because of first impressions.  Also, receptionists and secretaries may have more say in the hiring process than you realize.
     * Bring information you are likely to need: social security number, names, addresses, and phone numbers of references and past employers, salary requirements.  
     * Always ask the people you will be using for references for their permission to be used as a reference - and be sure they will recommend you positively (they might like you personally, but think you would be a lazy employee).

Step Three -  Interviewing
     
* ALWAYS dress appropriately.
     * Research typically asked questions and prepare  your answers in advance. 

According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), many students are likely to enrol in a business school because majority of employers in the US prefer those with a degree in business administration, accounting, and finance. And among master’s degrees, MBA is the most desirable.

Because of the increase in demand for business degrees and MBA, we at Discover Business have created a database of business schools in the US, where prospective students can carefully evaluate their schools and programs of choice. You can find it here:

Business School Program Guide

OnlineMasters.com obtains the information on business schools and their program offerings from the AACSB, ACBSP, NCES, and also from the admissions office of each business school through a direct correspondence. We have also included comprehensive guides on how to pass the SAT, ACT, GRE, and GMAT to help students get through admission.

OnlineMasters.com is to inspire others to influence society through the pursuit of higher education. We have an online database of tools, references, and articles that cover topics such as accreditation, job placement, and resources that can provide financial support. 

Resume writing guide for students is a guide to help teach high school students how to put together a high quality resume, even when they may not have any prior work experience.